Sanela Diana Jenkins, Founder

Sanela Diana Jenkins, Founder

Dr. Richard Steinberg, Project Director

Dr. Richard H. Steinberg, Project Director

The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project was established in 2009 by a generous gift from Sanela Diana Jenkins, who works on an on-going basis with UCLA faculty and students to advance the cause of human rights and international justice around the world. The Project engages in a range of activities, continuously identifying and pursuing the most promising opportunities for addressing human rights issues around the globe, while at the same time advancing understanding about human rights through interdisciplinary studies.

The Project utilizes the best scholarship and analyses of human rights and international justice from the fields of law, politics, sociology, history, and economics in order to set its agenda and select human rights opportunities to pursue. And it uses its practical engagement in human rights advocacy to improve scholarly understanding.

Typical activities have included the development and utilization of web-based technologies to advance human rights; assistance to and support of prosecutors and judges in international criminal tribunals; conferences, roundtable discussions, and speakers series focused on developing a breakthrough understanding of particular human rights challenges; and field research in conflict and post-conflict societies.

The Project also supports human rights and international justice by training the next generation of lawyers in the field. Professor Richard H. Steinberg is Director of the Project.

For more information, please contact Professor Richard H. Steinberg, Director, Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project, UCLA School of Law, (310) 267-2064.

The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project — Human Rights Law & Technology

  • Screenshot of the ICC Forum Invited Expert Page for the Africa Issue

    Invited Experts discuss the Africa question on the ICC Forum.

  • ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda and Professor Richard Steinberg at the International Criminal Court in The Hague.

    ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda and Professor Richard Steinberg at the International Criminal Court in The Hague.

  • In 2011, students visited the International Criminal Court in the Netherlands.

    In 2011 (above) and 2013 (below) the staff of the UCLA Human Rights & International Criminal Law Online Forum met with senior staff from the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court to coordinate work on the Forum.

    In 2013, students visited the International Criminal Court in the Netherlands.

Human Rights & International Criminal Law Online Forum The ICC Forum and Clinic. This Forum, at ICCforum.com, is an innovative and cooperative undertaking by the Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project at UCLA School of Law and the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC OTP). The Forum allows members of the legal community, governments, academics, and others to debate complex issues of international criminal law faced by the Office of the Prosecutor in the course of its work at the ICC.

The Forum was named one of the world’s Top Three Justice Innovations in 2012 by the Hague Institute for the Internationalization of Law (HiiL) and was recently named a Gold Medal Laureate winner for World Good by Computerworld Magazine.

UCLA Law students and faculty work with the International Criminal Court Office of the Prosecutor, legal scholars and practitioners from around the world, as well as technology experts, to run the Forum. Students make a year-long commitment to the project, researching and analyzing pressing issues that bear on the legal and institutional development of the International Criminal Court and that demand the attention of the prosecutor, Fatou Bensouda.

Students travel to The Hague to work with the Office of the Prosecutor, and to conflict and post-conflict zones around the world to conduct first-hand research that bears upon the questions of interest to the Prosecutor. In the 2012-13 academic year, students traveled to the Eastern Congo to research the reparations preferences of victims of mass atrocities, distill an anthropological “footprint” of mass rape that could be used as evidence at the ICC, and to explain what motivates combatants to disarm and demobilize.

Professor Richard H. Steinberg is Director of the Clinic and Editor-in-Chief of the Forum, which was launched on September 1, 2010 during the tenure of the first Prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo.

The first major question was:
“Does the Prosecutor of the ICC have the authority to open an investigation into alleged crimes committed in the 2008-2009 Gaza conflict?”
The second major question was:
“What are the obligations of Contracting Parties to the Genocide Convention to implement arrest warrants for genocide issued by the ICC, and of African Union State Parties to implement ICC arrest warrants generally?”
The third major question was:
“What is the proper balance between the independence of the International Criminal Court and the oversight role of the Assembly of States Parties regarding the Court’s administration under Article 112 of the Rome Statute?”
The fourth major question was:
“What measures should be taken to maximize the crime prevention impact of the International Criminal Court?”
The fifth major question was:
“What International Criminal Court reparations regime would be most appropriate for addressing mass atrocities and war crimes?”
The sixth major question was:
“Can the International Criminal Court sustain a conviction for the underlying crime of mass rape without testimony from victims?”
The current seventh major question is:
“Is the International Criminal Court targeting Africa inappropriately?”

Also recently completed on the Forum is an online debate, online course, and video lecture series, the products of a collaboration between UCLA School of Law; the Stanford Program on Human Rights; and Stanford’s Division of International, Comparative & Area Studies. Videos of talks by Richard Steinberg (also here), Helen Stacy (also here), Richard Dicker, James Fearon, M. Cherif Bassiouni, Ambassador David Scheffer, Carla Ferstman, William Pace, and Shamila Batohi lead off debates on a number of important topics including Politics and the ICC, the Security Council, Deterrence, Efficiency, Arrest, Victims, Peace, and Universality.

Students interested in working on the Human Rights & International Criminal Law Online Forum should contact Professor Richard H. Steinberg.

The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project — Conferences, Presentations, and Honored Speakers

The Project is committed to organizing major conferences that take advantage of important historical moments and opportunities to advance human rights.

  • FlyersFlyers 

    The American Society of International Law’s Second Annual Midyear Meeting and Research Forum. The conference was co-sponsored by the Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project and hosted by University of California-Los Angeles School of Law on November 3-5, 2011. The Midyear Meeting brought together hundreds of international law practitioners, scholars, and judges from more than thirty countries. Highlights included a luncheon and keynote speech by then International Criminal Court Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo, and a dialogue with International Court of Justice Judge Joan Donoghue. Other ASIL proceedings included an expert panel on international dispute resolution, a panel on recent developments in Alien Tort Statute litigation, and a day-long Research Forum.

    Four photos from the ASIL Midyear Meeting and Research Forum, November 4, 2011. Pictured are the first ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo, International Court of Justice Judge Joan Donoghue, Professor Richard H. Steinberg, and a group shot including Sanela Diana Jenkins.

    The 2011 ASIL Midyear Meeting and Research Forum featured a keynote by the first ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo and an address by International Court of Justice Judge Joan Donoghue.
    Also pictured are Professor Richard H. Steinberg and Sanela Diana Jenkins.

  • Dinner Honoring the First ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo. On November 5, 2011, Diana Jenkins and the Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project hosted a dinner in West Hollywood honoring Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the first Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. Guests included some of the world’s most influential international law professors and judges, as well as film and television producers and directors interested in advancing human rights, and leaders of human rights NGOs.

  • “Assessing the Legacy of the ICTY” Conference. The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project co-organized and co-sponsored this conference with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the Government of the Netherlands. The conference took place in February 2010 in the Hague and afforded a unique opportunity for stakeholders from the Balkans and other relevant international actors to comment on the Tribunal’s legacy vision in the former Yugoslavia, exchange information about the legacy work that is being carried out by the Tribunal and other UN and international organizations in the former Yugoslavia, and explore ways to improve cooperation in the pursuit of common goals. Particular attention was paid to building the capacity of national war crimes courts in the former Yugoslavia and to enabling their access to the ICTY's records and archives, without compromising witness security. Martinus Nijhoff has published a book “Assessing the Legacy of the ICTY” containing conference essays. For extensive background material and videos of the conference in several languages, click here.

    Four photos from the ICTY Conference: Assessing the Legacy of the ICTY

    In 2010, UCLA School of Law students served as rapporteurs at the ICTY conference. Photos courtesy of UN-ICTY, © 2010. L. Hondebrink-Hermer

  • The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Colloquium Series. The Project is committed to presenting cutting edge research on human rights. For examples and papers from the 2010 academic year, click here.

    Four photos from the 2009-2010 Human Rights Collloquium Series

    The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Colloquium Series has hosted Mr. Hasan Nuhanović (Sarajevo), Professor Jenny Martinez (Stanford Law School), Professor Larry Diamond (Stanford), and other distinguished speakers.

  • Honored Speakers. The project also sponsors occasional speeches by highly esteemed international figures in the human rights field, such as: Louise Arbour, Director of The International Crisis Group, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, and former Chief Prosecutor for the ICTY; Theodor Meron, Judge and Former President of the ICTY; and Haris Silajdžić, former President of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project — Field Work

  • The Dutchbat building in Srebrenica is now a memorial. Part of the cavernous Dutchbat building in Srebrenica/Potočari is preserved as a memorial.

  • Meeting with Bogoro elders. The UCLA Law group meets with the elders of Bogoro, a village victimized by mass murder and mass rape.

  • Interview of demobilized combatants The UCLA Law group interviews recently demobilized militia combatants in Goma.

  • Bosco Ntaganda Bosco Ntaganda, also known as “The Terminator,” is under indictment by the ICC for war crimes including conscripting young children into active hostilities.

The Project takes law students to locations around the world to study human rights issues and engage in the advancement of human rights. In 2011, law students visited Bosnia-Herzegovina, where human rights atrocities took place in the 1990s, most notably in Srebrenica, where 8,000 men and boys were brutally executed. The students interviewed survivors, met with local and national politicians, and worked with prosecutors to advance justice. They met with the chief war crimes prosecutor in Bosnia, and travelled to the Hague to work with prosecutors and judges at the ICTY.

In February 2012, Professor Steinberg led a group of students from the Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project on a research trip to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The trip was organized around three international human rights projects.

At the request of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, based in Geneva, they conducted a preliminary assessment of the extent of human trafficking in the Congo. Their report is available here.

At the suggestion of Human Rights Watch, the group assessed Congolese perceptions of the International Criminal Court (ICC), which is currently prosecuting several militia leaders from the Congo. Their assessment is available here.

In conjunction with the Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project’s work with the ICC Office of the Prosecutor, they also assessed the types of reparations that are preferred by Congolese victims of mass atrocities. The ICC has several million dollars of reparations funds to pay out in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, but there is no consensus on what form the reparations should take and who should receive them. The UCLA Law group decided to ask the victims, meeting with the regional chief, village chief and village elders in Bogoro, a village that had been victimized by mass murder and mass rape. The group’s findings are available here.

The group also had the opportunity to talk with recently demobilized militia combatants at the United Nations Demobilization, Disarmament, and Resettlement Camp in Goma. And, while working in Goma they unexpectedly came across the Congolese militia leader Bosco Ntaganda, who is wanted by the ICC on war crimes charges, and ultimately located his compound, which they exposed in a subsequent press release that garnered substantial attention in the region.

Professor Steinberg returns to the Congo with students in October 2012 to conduct additional research. After meeting with the village elders in Bogoro, who are all males, they will return to interview the women and children to see what kinds of reparations they prefer. The group’s conversations with the demobilized militia combatants in Goma have evolved into a project to help explain why militia combatants, particularly child soldiers, decide to demobilize and disarm, in order to propose policies that might facilitate more demobilization. Professor Steinberg and his students will also visit several villages in an effort to identify anthropological evidence of mass rape; the hope is that evidence of that type might be introduced at the International Criminal Court as a substitute for victim testimony, which is traumatic and stigmatizing to the victims.

The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project — Clinics & Student Scholars

The Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights & Technology Clinic. This clinic explores possible uses of technology to help advance international human rights and international justice.

Four photos from the Human Rights & Technology Clinic

Students demonstrating the Human Rights & International Criminal Law Online Forum to Sanela Diana Jenkins.

Clinic: Human Rights & International Criminal Law Online Forum. This clinic, which will run through at least the 2011-2012 academic year, supports the work of the ICC Forum. Students are expected to do extensive research and writing on forum topics, framing and analyzing issues before the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, and to assist with editing expert opinions that will appear in the Forum. To learn more about this clinic, contact Professor Richard H. Steinberg.

The Sanela Diana Jenkins International Justice Clinic, 2009-2011. UCLA law faculty and students have engaged in activities such as:

  • Work on projects related to accountability for illegal mineral extraction in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
  • Work with members of the Cambodian community to collect testimony from survivors of the Khmer Rouge for use by the Khmer Rouge Tribunal.
  • Research and advocacy to support U.S. engagement in the 2010 Review Conference of the International Criminal Court.
Ejup Ganic and Jovan Divjak

Ejup Ganić and Jovan Divjak

Actions on Behalf of Political Prisoners Around the World. The Project assisted in securing the release of Ejup Ganić and Jovan Divjak. Both had been investigated and effectively cleared of criminal charges by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia when they were arrested on politically-driven arrest warrants issued in Serbia. Ejup Ganić was arrested in England pursuant to a Serbian international arrest warrant and request for extradition. The arrest was vacated by an English court which wrote: “[t]hese proceedings are brought and being used for political purposes and as such amount to an abuse of the process of this court.” Jovan Divjak was arrested in Vienna pursuant to a Serbian international arrest warrant. He was eventually freed and extradition was denied after the Austrian court determined that he could not be guaranteed a fair trial in Serbia.

Jenni Williams, a Zimbabwean human rights activist and founder of Women of Zimbabwe Arise (“WOZA”), has worked with the Sanela Diana Jenkins Project. She has been arrested more than 40 times and, most recently, was arrested during a Valentine's day protest in Zimbabwe in 2012. She was held in brutal conditions. We worked with Amnesty International and other groups to secure her release. Our latest information is that she is currently free.

Sanela Diana Jenkins Scholars. Each spring, up to three UCLA law students may be named a Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Law Scholar. These students are selected for their superior academic performance and demonstrated interest in human rights. Each receives a scholarship toward tuition and will work on the Sanela Diana Jenkins Human Rights Project.

Sanela Diana Jenkins

Portrait of Sanela Diana Jenkins and the Mostar Peace Connection Prize

In 2008, Jenkins won the Mostar Peace Connection Prize for her humanitarian work.

Letter from Center for Peace and Multiethnic Cooperation (Mostar) Announcing Sanela Diana Jenkins winning the prize for her humanitarian works.

Sanela Diana Jenkins has turned a life of hardship into triumph, as she has developed into a successful business woman, a devoted mother, and a philanthropist. She is currently the Chairman, CEO, and founder of the U.S.- and U.K.-based drinks company Neuro.

As a native of Sarajevo, Bosnia, Jenkins lived her childhood and teenage years in the midst of genocide. She lived in the country long enough to graduate from Sarajevo University with a degree in economics. Shortly thereafter, Jenkins was forced to flee her homeland during the conflict in Bosnia, which was responsible for the death of her brother Irnis. Compelled to leave her parents behind, Jenkins found herself as a refugee in London, where she was eventually granted asylum.

It was in England where Jenkins began to lay the groundwork for her future. Jenkins enrolled in London’s City University to further her education. During her schooling, she learned English and worked odd jobs to support her parents back in Sarajevo. Not long after Jenkins discovered her new-found freedom, she met her husband Roger Jenkins, a financial executive in London, who was teaching classes at City University.

Jenkins has dedicated a large part of her attention back to her native land by establishing The Sanela Diana Jenkins Foundation for Bosnia in Memory of Irnis Ćatić. The Foundation, which is closely associated with the funding of the medical school at the University of Sarajevo, aims to provide financial support toward establishing Bosnian schools and orphanages. Additionally, it is instrumental in building homes for the country’s poor, supplying emergency aid & relief, and cleaning the country’s lakes and polluted areas. The Foundation is the largest privately funded Bosnian organization of its kind. In 2008, Jenkins won the Mostar Peace Connection Prize for her humanitarian work.

ICC Prosecutors Fatou Bensouda and Luis Moreno-Ocampo meet with Sanela Diana Jenkins at the International Criminal Court in The Hague. ICC Prosecutors Fatou Bensouda and Luis Moreno-Ocampo meet with Sanela Diana Jenkins at the International Criminal Court in The Hague.