Related Courses

Asylum Clinic

Students in this clinic represent clients in connection with asylum petitions under the Violence Against Women Act and the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act. Working with survivors of torture and trauma, students in this course receive training in such critical skills as interviewing, researching and writing declarations and briefs, fact development and trial advocacy.

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California Prison to Parole

This seminar introduces you to California prisons and the road 34,000 prisoners must travel in order to be released on parole. Through a series of assigned readings, lectures from former prisoners and current practitioners, and both virtual and actual tours of a California prison, students will gain an understanding of some of the constitutional, statutory and regulatory restrictions on prisoners' rights. Students will also learn how prisoners overcome structural, legal and political impediments to their successful reintegration into mainstream society. Each student is also required to submit a writing of at least 2,000 words on a prison or parole-related topic agreeable to both student and professor. Because the seminar has only three class meetings, students must attend all three unless prior makeup arrangements are made with the professor.

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International Human Rights Clinic

This course provides students with both training in international human rights law theory and the opportunity to apply that theory in the service of real clients. Students work in teams to collaborate with international human rights organizations to help them achieve their legal and advocacy goals.

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Street Law – American Legal Education

This course allows students to teach law in a variety of high school classrooms throughout the Los Angeles area. Law students learn to communicate legal concepts to non-lawyers and develop such critical legal skills as establishing trust and building rapport.

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Tribal Legal Development Clinic

This clinic provides students with a unique opportunity to work with Native Nations located within the United States on their legal development projects. At the request of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian governments and organizations, students work under the supervision of clinical faculty on projects including constitution drafting and reform; drafting and amendment of statutes; creation of Western-style, traditional and hybrid dispute resolution processes; and law clerk services to such forums.

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Veterans’ Benefits Clinic

This course is designed for students with an interest in seeking justice for homeless veterans with disabilities who have been wrongfully denied access to benefits by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The course offers class instruction on veterans benefits law, trauma informed client interviewing skills, factual development, and brief writing. Students use that foundation to work with Inner City Law Center's Homeless Veterans Project to represent homeless veterans.

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Youth and Justice Clinic

This clinic examines the role of the lawyer in the juvenile justice process. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students in this course represent detained youth on non-criminal, civil legal issues. The course provides opportunities, through both simulation and work on real cases, for students to develop skills in client interviewing and counseling, case preparation, expert interviewing, motion/brief writing, policy briefing and institutional advocacy.

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