2016 CRS Events

Frontlines: Policing at the Nexus of Race and Mental Health

Frontlines

February 2, 2016

Link to video

Introduction: Jyoti Nanda (Lecturer in Law)

Speaker: Camille Nelson, Professor of Law and former Dean at Suffolk University Law School

A widely published scholar and sought-after speaker, Camille Nelson is an expert on the intersection of critical race theory and cultural studies with particular emphasis on criminal law and procedure, health law, and comparative law. Nelson recently served a 5-year term (2010–2015) as dean of Suffolk University Law School in Boston, where she is currently a professor of law. During her tenure as dean at Suffolk, she led the creation of the school’s first strategic plan and achieved considerable successes in fundraising, grant writing, and program and partnership development.

This event was co-sponsored by Repair


Security, Theology, Surveillance and the Politics of Fear

Security Theology Surveillance

February 3, 2016

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Speaker: Nadera Shalhoub Kevorkian, Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law and the School of Social Work and Social Welfare, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian is a longtime anti-violence, Palestinian feminist activist and scholar.  She is the Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law at the Faculty of Law-Institute of Criminology and the School of Social Work and Public Welfare at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Shalhoub-Kevorkian is also the director of the Gender Studies Program at Mada al-Carmel, the Arab Center for Applied Social Research in Haifa. Her research focuses on femicide and other forms of gendered violence, crimes of abuse of power in settler colonial contexts, surveillance, securitization, and trauma in militarized and colonized zones. Her most recent book, Security Theology, Surveillance and the Politics of Fear was published by Cambridge University Press in 2015.  As a resident of the old city of Jerusalem, Shalhoub-Kevorkian engages in direct actions and critical dialogue to end the inscription of power over Palestinian children’s lives, spaces of death, and women’s birthing bodies and lives.

This event was co-sponsored by UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies


Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution: Screening and Discussion

Black Panthers

February 18, 2016

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The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution is the first feature-length documentary to explore the Black Panther Party, its significance to the broader American culture, its cultural and political awakening for black people, and the painful lessons wrought when a movement derails.  After a screening of the film, the Critical Race Studies Program hosted a discussion featuring:

Kimberle Crenshaw, Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

Cheryl Harris, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, UCLA School of Law Interim Chair, UCLA Department of African American Studies

Ericka Huggins, Human rights activist, poet, educator, Black Panther leader and former political prisoner

Robin D.G. Kelley, Gary B. Nash Professor of American History, UCLA

Uri McMillan, Associate Professor of English and African American Studies, UCLA

This event was co-sponsored by African American Policy Forum and UCLA African American Studies Center


Is Separation the Solution?

May 6, 2016

Link to video

May 7, 2016

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In recent years, single-sex education has been promoted as a critical intervention to target achievement disparities and related challenges facing boys of color. While the prevalence of single-sex education has steadily declined throughout the nation as a whole, single-sex classrooms have reemerged as an attractive option within initiatives such as My Brothers Keeper and other male empowerment programs. Gender-separated interventions have been premised on the assumption that boys and girls of color face distinct disparities, and that these unique challenges are best approached by distinctly gendered approaches to education.
This convening brought together researchers, practitioners, advocates and philanthropic partners to explore the rise of gender-separate approaches to public education reform. Among the central questions to considered were: What conceptions of racial justice and gender difference underwrite the move to gender separate solutions to low achievement? Are there gender disparities in private and public resources being made available to address the needs of boys of color and girls of color? If so, how can this problem be addressed? What legal issues are raised by the proliferation of single-sex classes and schools, and how can we ensure that Title IX and constitutional protections are enforced? What role should philanthropy and community engagement play in elevating the values of race and gender equity in contemporary school reform?

Speaker: Kimberle Crenshaw, Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

This event was co-sponsored by UCLA Gender Working Group, UCLA Center for American Politics and Public Policy (CAPPP), UCLA Department of Gender Studies, UCLA Race and Ethnicity Working Group, UCLA Department of African American Studies, California NOW Chapter of Greater Los Angeles, African American Policy Forum, Columbia Law Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies


Race and Supreme Court

Race and the Supreme Court Poster 2

September 15, 2016

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Critical Race scholars engaged in a discussion of the 2015-16 Supreme Court term and the ramifications of its decisions.

Moderator: Jasleen Kohli, Director, Critical Race Studies Program, UCLA School of Law

Panelists:

Beth Colgan, Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

Michele Bratcher Goodwin, Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Director, Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy, University of California, Irvine School of Law

Cheryl Harris, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, UCLA School of Law Interim Chair, UCLA Department of African American Studies

Hiroshi Motomura, Susan Westerberg Prager Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

Angela R. Riley, Professor of law and Director, MA/JD Joint Degree Program in Law and American Indian Studies Director, Native Nations Law and Policy Center, UCLA School of Law

This event was co-sponsored by David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy, Asian/Pacific Islander Law Students Association, Black Law Students Association, La Raza Law Students Association, Muslim Law Students Association, Native American Law Students Association, South Asian Law Students Association, Womyn of Color Collective


Fifteen Years on: "Divided We Fall" and the Politics of Race and Religion after 9/11

Fifteen Years On

September 19, 2016

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When a turbaned Sikh man is brutally murdered in the aftermath of September 11, 2001, a college student journeys across America to discover who counts as "one of us" in a world divided into "us" and "them." Armed with only a camera, Valarie Kaur encounters hundreds of stories never before told - stories of fear and unspeakable loss, but also of resilience and hope - until she finally finds the heart of America, halfway around the world, in the words of a widow. Weaving expert analysis into a personal journey and cross-country road trip, the film confronts the forces dividing a nation.  Professor Asli Bali led a discussion after a screening of the film.

Speaker: Asli Bali, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Near Eastern Studies

This event was co-sponsored by UCLA Office of Student Affairs


Race, Racism and American Law, Re-visioning for the 21st Century

Race Racism and American Law

September 22, 2016

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Derrick Bell’s seminal textbook, Race, Racism and American Law, first issued in 1972, was a groundbreaking intervention that challenged the dominant view of legal pedagogy as a race-neutral process and product. Unlike other casebooks that adopted "perspectivelessness" as the mark of objectivity. Bell pursued a complex, more accurate vision, rooted in history and inspired by a black radical tradition. Its impact was throughout the legal academy and resonates still.

The co-authors of the seventh edition, Professor Cheryl I. Harris and Justin Hansford, led a panel discussion on the significance and legacy of Bell’s text, and were joined by experts in the field of race, racism and American Law who are part of the project of re-visioning the text for the 21st Century.

Speakers:

Cheryl Harris, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, UCLA School of Law Interim Chair, UCLA Department of African American Studies

Justin Hansford, Associate Professor, St. Louis University School of Law

This event was co-sponsored by UCLA Institute of American Cultures, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation, UCLA Asian American Studies Center, Office of the Special Assistant for Diversity St. Louis University, St. Louis University School of Law