Herbert Morris

Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Law Emeritus

  • B.A. UCLA, 1951
  • LL.B. Yale, 1954
  • D.Phil. Oxford, 1956
  • UCLA Philosophy Faculty Since 1956
  • UCLA Law Faculty Since 1962

Herbert Morris holds a joint appointment with the UCLA Department of Philosophy and recently has taught Criminal Law I, and Law, Philosophy and Literature. He is a nationally recognized philosopher of law and received the Constantine Panunzio Distinguished Emeritus Award for 2019-20.

Professor Morris served as Dean of Humanities of UCLA's College of Letters and Science from 1983 to 1993, and Interim Provost of the College from 1992 to 1993. He chaired the Board of Governors of the University's Humanities Research Institute from 1988 to 1990.

Professor Morris has lectured and written widely on moral and legal philosophy, including On Guilt and Innocence: Essays in Legal Philosophy and Moral Psychology (University of California Press, 1976).  He is also the author of several works of literary criticism: The Masked Citadel: The Significance of the Title of Stendhal's La Chartreuse de Parme (University of California Press, 1961), "What Emma Knew: The Outrage Suffered in Jorge Luis Borges’s Emma Zunz” (Indiana Journal of Hispanic Literatures, 1997) and Disclosures: Essays on Art, Literature, and Philosophy (self-published, 2017). He is editor of On Guilt and Shame (Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1971) and Freedom and Responsibility: Readings in Philosophy and Law (Stanford University Press, 1961).

Bibliography

  • Books
    • Disclosures: Essays on Art, Literature, and Philosophy. Amazon (2017). Amazon
    • . Artists in Evil: An Essay on Evil and Redemption in Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time (2009).  Independently published.
    • On Guilt and Innocence: Essays in Legal Philosophy and Moral Psychology. University of California Press (1976).
    • On Guilt and Shame (edited by Herbert Morris). Wadsworth (1971).
    • The Masked Citadel: The Significance of the Title of Stendhal’s “La Chartreuse de Parme”. University of California Press (1968).
    • Freedom and Responsibility: Readings in Philosophy and Law (edited by Herbert Morris). Stanford University Press (1961).
  • Articles And Chapters
    • On the Soul, 94 Philosophy 221-42 (2019). Full Text
    • The Absent and Present Serpent in Nicolas Poussin’s SPRING, XVI (1) Cahiers de dix-septieme siecle, 17 63-76 (2015).
    • Murphy on Forgiveness, 7 Criminal Justice Ethics 15-19 (1988).
    • George Fletcher and Collective Guilt: A Critical Commentary on the 2001 Storrs Lectures, 78 Notre Dame Law Review 731-50 (2003).
    • Sex, Shame, and Assorted Other Topics, 22 Quinnipiac University Law Review 123-43 (2003).
    • Some Further Reflections on Guilt and Punishment, 18 Law & Philosophy 363-78 (1999).
    • The Future of Punishment, 46 UCLA Law Review 1927-31 (1999).
    • What Emma Knew: The Outrage Suffered in Jorge Luis Borges's Emma Zunz, 10-11 Indiana Journal of Hispanic Literatures 165-202 (1997).
    • Professor Murphy on Liberalism and Retributivism, 37 Arizona Law Review 95-104 (1995). Symposium: Issues in the Philosophy of Law.
    • The Decline of Guilt, 99 Ethics 62-76 (1888).
    • Nonmoral Guilt, in Responsibility, Character and the Emotions: New Essays in Moral Psychology, 220-40 (edited by Ferdinand D. Schoeman, Cambridge University Press, 1987).
    • Legal Guilt, in Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice, 820-24 (edited by Sanford H. Kadish, Free Press, 1983).
    • A Paternalistic Theory of Punishment, 18 American Philosophical Quarterly 263-71 (1981). Reprinted in Paternalism 139-52 (edited by Rolf Sartorius, University of Minnesota Press, 1983).
    • Reflections on Feeling Guilty, 40 Philosophical Studies 187-93 (1981).
    • The Status of Rights, 92 Ethics 40-51 (1981).
    • Discussion: Addiction and Criminal Responsibility (with James Coleman and Thomas Scheff), 9 Center Magazine 46-58 (1976).
    • Criminal Insanity, 17 Inquiry 345-55 (1974).
    • Shared Guilt, in Wisdom: Twelve Essays, 249-73 (edited by Renford Bambrough, Rowman & Littlefield, 1974).
    • The Nature of Legal Responsibility, in Dictionary of the History of Ideas, 33-36 (edited by Philip Paul Weiner, Scribner, 1973).
    • Guilt and Suffering, 21 Philosophy East & West 419-34 (1971).
    • Guilt and Punishment, 52 Personalist 305-21 (1971).
    • Persons and Punishment, 52 Monist 475-501 (1968).
    • John Austin, Encyclopedia of Philosophy 209-11 (edited by Paul Edwards, Macmillan, 1967).
    • Punishment for Thoughts, 49 Monist 342-76 (1965).
    • Dean Pound's Jurisprudence, 13 Stanford Law Review 185-210 (1960).
    • Imperatives and Orders, XXVI Theoria 183-209 (1960). Reprinted as Imperatives and Orders. Goeteborg (1960).
    • Verbal Disputes and the Legal Philosophy of John Austin, 7 UCLA Law Review 27-56 (1960).
  • Other
    • Book Review, 18 UCLA Law Review 1164-72 (1971). Reviewing The Manufacture of Madness, by Thomas Szasz.
    • Book Review, 75 Harvard Law Review 1452-61 (1962). Reviewing The Concept of Law, by H.L.A. Hart.
    • Book Review, 7 UCLA Law Review 566-69 (1960). Reviewing The Great Legal Philosophies: Selected Readings in Jurisprudence, edited by Clarence Morris.
    • Book Review, 12 Stanford Law Review 514-25 (1960). Reviewing The Complexity of Legal and Ethical Experience, by F.S.C. Northrop.