The Law and Philosophy Program Presents: "One Night In Jackson, Mississippi: Discriminatory Permissions and Structural Injustice" with Professor Lawrence Sager

There is an important, somewhat overlooked, resource in the legal clash between the rights of members of the LGBT community to equal treatment and claims of religious freedom.

Please join us in Law Room 1347 on March 3, 2020 for a two part lunchtime talk with Professor Lawrence Sager, Distinguished Scholar in Residence, UCLA Law and Philosophy Program & Visiting Professor, as he presents "One Night In Jackson, Mississippi: Discriminatory Permissions and Structural Injustice."

This is the first of a two-part lunchtime series. The second part will be held on March 4, 2020.

There is an important, somewhat overlooked, resource in the legal clash between the rights of members of the LGBT community to equal treatment and claims of religious freedom. When the government permits discrimination, the permission itself is state action, even if the discrimination in question is private. When a permission sends a signal approving of discrimination against the victims of structural injustice, that permission is inconsistent with the equality provisions of the Constitution, and, for over a century, the Court has been willing to invalidate such discriminatory permissions. This means that Mississippi's H.B. 1523, which gives Mississippi residents explicit permission to act on religious beliefs that are antithetical to the equal treatment of members of the LGBT community — and laws like it — are invalid on Equal Protection grounds.