Critical Race Studies Symposium

Flyer for the 2023 Critical Race Studies Symposium featuring an image of Gerald Lopez

REBELLIOUS

Envisioning And Embodying Radical Practice

Honoring All Rebellious Practitioners – Including Gerald P. López

October 5 & 6 | UCLA School of Law

Gerald P. López published Rebellious Lawyering: One Chicano’s Vision of Progressive Law Practice in 1992. The book brought to life how he and others had been practicing for decades. Through “fictional characters and settings as real as can be,” Rebellious Lawyering illuminated how people do what they do when collaborating with others as equals. To fight subordination of every sort. To transform institutions, systems, nations, and transnational life.  To personify – and not just prefigure – the concrete utopias they seek. Militantly challenging subordination in all forms and transforming life as we know it are at the center of the rebellious vision, and UCLA Law’s Critical Race Studies program is honored to devote this symposium to looking at rebellious practice past, present, and future.


NOTE: You MUST register no later than September 28th to attend this event.

Register Now for the 2023 Symposium

Relive the discussions and presentations from past CRS symposia.

View Past Critical Race Studies Symposia

See our agenda below or download a copy.

Download a copy of the Symposium Agenda

Symposium Information & Agenda

  • About the Symposium

    Download a copy of the Symposium Agenda


    Gerald P. López published Rebellious Lawyering: One Chicano’s Vision of Progressive Law Practice in 1992. The book brought to life how he and others had been practicing for decades. Through “fictional characters and settings as real as can be,” Rebellious Lawyering illuminated how people do what they do when collaborating with others as equals. To fight subordination of every sort. To transform institutions, systems, nations, and transnational life. To personify – and not just prefigure – the concrete utopias they seek.

    The rebellious vision traces its origins, as López emphasizes, to varied traditions of radical work passed down across generations. It grounds its particulars in the diverse array of social movements that arose in the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. And it anticipated movements coming into being in the most recent decades, some with resurrected names and some with new names, all borrowing from earlier eras. Earlier eras too often unappreciated and unstudied today. Earlier eras too often entirely ignored.

    In the rebellious vision, all working for radical change are “co-eminent practitioners.” There’s no permanent hierarchy. No fixed roles designating in advance and always leaders and followers. No messianic rulers. No one conniving to be “The Star.” All involved bring their knowledge of practice to these collaborations. Sharing ideas and skills and sensibilities. Challenging one another about how best to frame problems, to employ diverse ensembles of strategies, to adapt on the fly to feedback, to take stock of outcomes, to anticipate backlash. They cooperate to get better as teams and as people. To get better to overturn a malevolent status quo that regards some as genetically and culturally unequal and that considers burning fossil fuels “harmless enough.”

    For over three decades, the rebellious vision of practice has reverberated across the United States, indigenous peoples and tribal nations, and other countries (Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, England India, Italy, Scotland). In all these places, it challenges the “the regnant vision,” the familiar top-down experts-rule approach to practice that still dominates “colorblind” institutions and conventional race-conscious public interest organizations and organizing campaigns. The same regnant vision that, regrettably, still pervades some strands of today’s liberation movements. Unless how we work – unless our practice, how we do what we do -- embodies our anti-subordination and transformational aspirations, we’re doomed to reproduce precisely what we claim to topple.

    We can see the rebellious vision all around us and often enough within us. Already present in diverse settings. In communities still targeted as sub-human. In some organizations and organizing drives collaborating with members of these communities. In some graduate, undergraduate, pre-K, K-12 and, prison education. In the efforts of some visual artists, sustainable agriculture co-ops, bloggers, musicians, green raiteros, filmmakers, debt abolitionists, and writers. In continuing education for professions as diverse as psychiatry (“RebPych”) and law (“RebLaw”). We can choose, if we’re willing, to commit ourselves to a practice – to a way of working and living with others – that already embodies the radically transformed world we seek.

    Militantly challenging subordination in all forms and transforming life as we know it are at the center of the rebellious vision, and UCLA Law’s Critical Race Studies program is honored to devote this symposium to looking at rebellious practice past, present, and future.

    NOTE: UCLA School of Law is a State Bar of California MCLE provider. MCLE credit for this symposium is currently pending approval.

  • Thursday October 5, 2023

    2:00 pm – 2:30 pm
    Registration


    2:30 pm – 2:45 pm
    Welcome

    Michael Waterstone, Dean and Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law
    Laura E. Gόmez, Professor of Law and Co-Founder of Critical Race Studies Program, UCLA School of Law


    2:45 pm - 4:30: pm
    Plenary Roundtable: One Hell of a Radical Ride – The Past, Present, and Future of Rebellious Practice

    Moderator:
    Shauna Marshall, Professor Emerita and Co-Director of the Center for Racial and Economic Justice, UC College of Law, San Francisco

    Panelists:
    Martha L. Gómez, Deputy Attorney General, Department of Justice, UCLA Law ‘10
    Gina Hong, Attorney and Collective Member, LA Center for Community Law & Action, UCLA Law ‘18
    Dale Minami, Found & Senior Counsel, Minami Tamaki LLP and Co-Founder of the Asian Law Caucus and the Asian American Bar Association of the Greater Bay Area
    Sunita Patel, Assistant Professor of Law and Faculty Director, UCLA Veterans Legal Clinic, UCLA School of Law

    What does toppling the status quo -- people and personnel – require of radical practitioners? In how they do their work with others? In facing hostile enemies and squeamish “allies”? In dealing with disdainful and indifferent co-workers? What does it take to bluntly question, defy, and oppose people, institutions, and systems accustomed to crushing dissenters? What does it take to see a battle through? Especially when some take years and generations? Sometimes especially when victory – in the form, say, of a new law or a successful judgment – doesn’t mean much unless and until it’s implemented through on-the- ground practices? What must we bring each day to our work with others to force authoritarian governments to concede they have lied, cheated, stolen? To force ruthless employers and landlords to acknowledge their racism? To force arrogant educational institutions – individually and system-wide -- to admit they use “merit” to cover their consciously discriminatory choices?

    Our moderator and panelists have founded and helped develop organizations, programs, and agencies that, working with individual clients and subordinated communities and diverse allies, challenged the racism, misogyny, classism, homophobia, xenophobia practiced by employers, landlords, local and state governments; that forced the United States to admit and to repair the generational damage it caused through the internment of Japanese Americans; that held universities accountable for illegal denials of tenure and for the neglect of low-income, of color, and immigrant communities surrounding campuses; that overturned school districts’ racist targeting of Latinx and Black students for suspension and expulsion and challenged governmental targeting of Muslims in the wake of 9/11. And they have called out everything from the failure of all government to provide robust support for unhoused and housing-insecure populations to the self-promoting regnant practices pursued by well-heeled public interest “impact organizations” and high volume “service work.”


    4:30 pm – 4:45 pm
    Break


    4:45 pm - 6:30 pm
    Plenary Roundtable: Affirmative Action – The Real Deal and Not Just Harvard Admissions

    Moderator:
    Gerald P. López, Professor of Law Emeritus, UCLA School of Law

    Panelists:
    Eric Cohen, Executive Director, Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC)
    Maisha Nelson, Director of Human Resources for the Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) in San Francisco and Founder & CEO of Partnerships with Purpose (P2)
    Mona Tawatao, Legal Director, Equal Justice Society
    Sherod Thaxton, Professor of Law and former Faculty Director of the David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy, UCLA School of Law

    What must rebellious racial justice advocacy look like in a world without race-conscious affirmative action? The Supreme Court, diverse elites, and many others enthusiastically proclaim that banning race-conscious affirmative action now returns us to the merit-based systems central to all opportunities in the United States. Really? You do not need to be a student of history to understand that the ubiquitous white privilege we observe today was made possible by what we accurately can call affirmative action for Whites. Governmental programs – in coordination with networks of private institutions and people – have concentrated advantage in white communities and concentrated disadvantage in non-white communities. These racially discriminatory practices and policies created the White middle- and upper-middle class. And the same practices and policies have made it exceedingly difficult – sometimes impossible -- for most non-Whites to even have a fair chance at the American Dream. The kicker? Both the success (for Whites) and the suffering (for non-Whites) are passed down from generation to generation.

    “Merit” (human capital) is the rhetoric among elites. But financial and social capital is the reality.This is why White kids born on third base can go through life thinking they’ve hit a triple. Meanwhile non-Whites -- especially Latinx, Blacks, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders and Filipinos -- are labeled dysfunctional and defective for their inability pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. But the world of powerful elites extends far beyond the swankiest schools and fanciest jobs. Across the country, there are always those who, in their own spheres of influence, wield an aggregate power far greater than The Ivy League, Capitol Hill, the Supreme Court Building, and Wall Street. These other elites, who remain overwhelmingly White, rule over state capitals, counties, cities, and rural areas and everything from education to housing to employment to banking to criminal justice to immigration to elections. And they rule through racism, cronyism, and crude proxies for merit than reinforce the status quo. If without race-conscious affirmative action we want our future not to look like our past, must rebellious practitioners abolish affirmative action for Whites?


    6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
    Reception

  • Friday October 6, 2023

    8:30 am – 9:30am
    Registration & Continental Breakfast


    9:30 am – 9:45 am
    Welcome

    Sherod Thaxton, Professor of Law and former Faculty Director of the David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy, UCLA School of Law
    Jasleen Kohli, Executive Director, Critical Race Studies Program, UCLA School of Law


    9:45am – 11:15am
    Plenary Roundtable: Why Aren’t Far More People Already in Favor of Transforming Many Institutions in Our Lives?

    Moderator:
    Colin Cloud Hampson, Partner, Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP

    Panelists:
    Alina Ball, Professor of Law, Bion M. Gregory Chair in Business Law, and Co-Director of the Center for Racial and Economic Justice, UC College of Law, San Francisco, UCLA Law ‘08
    Michelle Tseching Fei, Justice Liaison, UnitedHealthcare Community Plan of Hawai'i (Medicaid)
    Craig B. Futterman, Clinical Professor of Law, Director of Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project, University of Chicago Law School
    Yumari Martínez, Esq., Founding Executive Director, Catalyze Justice

    Calls to abolish law enforcement have met with significant support and criticism, both within and outside of marginalized communities. None of this much surprised our boldly rebellious panelists. The wonder is quite the opposite. Once abolition became defined as fundamental transformation (as dismantling, redesigning, rebuilding), why haven’t far more people been calling for the abolition of a far wider set of institutions? If we’re talking transform, how about the Los Angeles Unified School District? The Bureau of Indian Affairs? Juvenile justice systems? The California Department of Motor Vehicles? Indian Health Services? The United States Department of Agriculture? Homeland Security? The Chicago Police Department? Universities? The Florida and Texas systems of governance? Nashville’s traditional country music scene? The political economy? And on and on. The idea is as reasonable as reasonable can be: Shouldn’t all sensible folks come to understand that demanding fundamental transformation is a profoundly rational and sober response to institutions built and staffed to fail? To keep subordinated communities subordinated? To institutions that can be described as “working” only if we assume they are designed and staffed not to work – not even for most in the middle class? Built and staffed to grotesquely betray their publicly professed missions? What explains why far more people don’t clamor for transforming a wide range of institutions? We certainly don’t need more “studies” and “pilot projects” that go nowhere and reinstate the status quo. We certainly don’t need to throw out “just a few bad apples.” Why don’t far more people – and all rebellious practitioners, really -- demand fundamental transformation on a fast-track schedule? Fast-tracked transformation now?


    11:15 am – 11:30 am
    Break


    11:30 am – 1:00 pm
    Plenary Roundtable: Transforming the Education of Rebellious Practitioners

    Moderator:
    Andrés Dae Keun Kwon, Senior Policy Counsel and Senior Organizer, ACLU Southern California, UCLA Law ‘16

    Panelists:
    Jessica Cobb, Researcher and Advocate for Education Justice, former Policy Director, National Center for Youth Law, and former Director, Norco College Prison Education Program, UCLA Law ‘18
    Jullian Harris-Calvin, Director of Greater Justice New York at The Vera Institute, UCLA Law ‘13
    Ana Graciela Nájera Mendoza, Senior Staff Attorney, Educational Equity Team, ACLU Southern California and former associate at Alexander, Krakow and Glick a plaintiff civil rights firm, UCLA Law ‘14
    Ian Stringham, Attorney, Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles, UCLA Law ‘18

    If you liberated your imagination, if you had available all the resources now found across a university and all the opportunities in communities beyond a university’s borders, how would you design the education of rebellious practitioners? And how would you continue this education into the future, over years of work, across a lifetime? Building upon and extending what ambitious and effective practitioners need to know? Or perhaps should want to know in world they would come to see differently than most do now? How would you transform learning and teaching as the boundaries now separating universities and communities would grow more porous and perhaps disappear altogether?

    Our moderator and panelists broke free of conventional wisdom. As students of the Rebellious Lawyering Clinic, the Legal Analysis Workshop, and graduates of UCLA Law’s Critical Race Studies Program, they rejected the bi-partisan way to “do law school.” Instead, looking across the university and out into communities and prisons and jails and detention centers, they packaged together an education more demanding, ingenious, and illuminating than tradition recommends. Then they threw themselves into the most demanding practices. Working with people charged with crimes and with immigration offenses. With employees battling wage theft, racial discrimination, sexual harassment. With K-12 students regarded by school districts as unworthy of ambitious and effective education. With incarcerated adults in need of well-run prison libraries and in-person education. They worked ambitiously within the very institutions and systems they aimed to fundamentally transform. If they were starting education from scratch, what would they envision? A collage of the best they found and helped to create? Something even more creative still? An education always in-the-making?


    1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
    Lunch


    2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
    Plenary Roundtable: Rebellious Vocations, Rebellious Lives

    Moderator:
    Tara Ford, Senior Counsel, Opportunity Under Law, Public Counsel & Co-Founder Pegasus Legal Services for Children

    Panelists:
    Bill Ong Hing, Professor of Law and Migration Studies, Director of the Immigration and Deportation Defense Clinic, and Dean’s Circle Scholar, University of San Francisco School of Law and Founder of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC)
    Brenda Montes, Immigration Attorney, Montes Law Firm, UCLA Law ‘11
    Gary Peck, former Executive Director, ACLU of Nevada
    Ascanio Piomelli, Professor of Law, UC College of Law, San Francisco

    If being rebellious is a vocation, a calling, how can we be healthy when work and life can be so tough? Or does that pose the question in exactly the wrong way? Does health lie in embracing demanding ways of being? And being around others who do the same? Avoiding at all costs “parlor generals and field deserters,” as Marge Piercy urges, and seeking out those who “move in a common rhythm when food must come in or the fire be put out”? For the historically subordinated all this has always been a necessity, right? A necessity to survive and thrive? Surviving and thriving is, as Audre Lorde teaches, “the ability to change, to metabolize experience, good and ill, into something that is useful, lasting, effective.” Mustn’t we all, as Lorde says, “become fast learners”?

    These panelists – among the most admired of radical practitioners – have done so much. Founded rebellious organizations, offices, and programs. Transformed others. Taken heavy hits. Lived with deep disappointments. Learned from mistakes and from successes. They’re not into martyrdom or sainthood. Not into “suffering as a badge of courage.” They do enjoy music, sports, yoga, art, dance, cooking, and poetry. Highs of many sorts. Yet they know there’s no “answer.” Work-life balance? Really, achieving and sustaining an equilibrium? When some people need to escape the horror of their lives far more than the demands of their jobs? When work is not “just a job” and life is “too much a bad job”? How then do they unflinchingly face realities and treat each day as a new opportunity? How do they learn from others? Across time, from afar, in our midst? Larn from all those they work with how to be healthy as together we transform our world? Learn how to be rebellious?


    4:00 pm – 4:15 pm
    Break


    4:15 pm – 6:00 pm
    Plenary Roundtable: A Conversation and a Closing

    Introduction:
    Sherod Thaxton, Professor of Law and former Faculty Director of the David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy, UCLA School of Law

    Conversationalists:
    Stephen Carpenter, Deputy Director and Senior Staff Attorney, Farmers’ Legal Action Group
    Gerald P. Lόpez, Professor of Law Emeritus, UCLA School of Law
    Shauna Marshall, Professor Emerita and Co-Director of the Center for Racial and Economic Justice, UC College of Law, San Francisco
    Sherod Thaxton, Professor of Law and former Faculty Director of the David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy, UCLA School of Law

    Closing:
    Gerald P. Lόpez, Professor of Law Emeritus, UCLA School of Law

    In this final roundtable, we offer a conversation and then a closing.

    The panelists’ conversation has not been scripted. Nothing’s been declared “off-limits.” Nothing has been declared “a necessity to talk about.” Instead, the conversation will draw upon all that has happened through October 6, 2023, including at this Symposia.

    To evoke only a bit of the possible:

    When elected Latinx City Council members spew hateful racist comments in their ignorant jokey-jokey fashion, we must immediately get rid of them. And their redistricting plans. And all those complicit in what they have done. And get rid of all those implicated in any “machine” these Latinx City Council members are part of. Drive them all out. Immediately. We can and must clean up our own houses. And, yes, we can without taking our eye off the pervasive practices and effects of White Supremacy. Hard stop.

    On May 25, 2020, in the early morning hours, Amy Cooper called the police with a racist made-up story about Christian Cooper, a birdwatcher in Central Park. Later that same day, Derek Chauvin took George Floyd’s life in Minneapolis, with fellow police officers watching and doing nothing to stop the killing. Chauvin’s killing of George Floyd sparked a world-wide movement. Amy Cooper’s lies to the police about Christian Cooper drew much attention but only for a relatively short time. Never forget Derek Chauvin taking George Floyd’s life. Never forget Amy Cooper’s call to the police about Christian Cooper.

    Why isn’t the rebellious practice of Farmers’ Legal Action Group (FLAG) talked about by every organization doing progressive and radical work? Drawing upon and collaborating with “farm advocates,” family farmers helping themselves, their neighbors, and others (regionally and even statewide) handle the problems they all regularly face. Working with family-farm-accountable organizers and organizations. Fighting race and gender discrimination often ignored in talk of civil rights in part because the race and gender diversity among family farmers remains unappreciated. Acknowledging publicly what’s particularly difficult and only partially successful in the work they do. Always aiming -- in fact and not just in principle – to get better still.

    Why don’t we all already know about how the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska took over its own health care system? How the Winnebago refused any longer to endure the horrible services provided by Indian Health Services? How they’ve built and staffed their own hospital, all within a comprehensive scheme? And why don’t we know about the many people involved? Including Colin Cloud Hampson? Including Danelle Smith? Who took years away from her Indian Law practice to serve as the CEO of Winnebago Healthcare System? If we’re looking in our midst for what many (probably most) would regard as impossible dreams of self-determination, why not learn about the Winnebago and their health care system?

    Is the cure for Trumpism a renewed respect for the rule of law? The rule of law led to the Supreme Court’s decisions in the Chinese Exclusion Cases, Plessy v. Ferguson, Buck v. Bell, Pace v. Alabama, United States v. Brignoni-Ponce? That led to the Compromise of 1877, an informal agreement that made Rutherford Hayes president in exchange for ending and gutting Reconstruction, returning absolute power to the Southern states? That led Earl Warren to lie about the legal necessity to intern Japanese Americans? That led Colin Powell to lie to the UN Security Council about Iraq’s huge stash of weapons of mass destruction? That led Justices Kennedy, O’Connor, Rehnquist, Scalia, and Thomas to award the presidency to George Bush over Al Gore?


    6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
    Reception and Dinner, UCLA School of Law Shapiro Courtyard

  • FAQ (Parking, Transportation, Accommodations, etc.)

    Date and Time of Symposium
    Thursday, October 5, 2023
    2:00pm to 6:30pm, followed by a reception from 6:30 to 7:30pm

    Friday, October 6, 2023
    8:30am to 6:00pm, followed by a reception from 6 to 8pm

    Symposium Location
    UCLA School of Law
    385 Charles E. Young Drive East
    Los Angeles, CA 90095


     

    Food/Accommodations
    Meals and refreshments will be offered during the symposium, including vegan options. However, if you have particular food restrictions, we advise that it may be prudent to bring your own food or visit one of the restaurants or cafés on campus.

    SEVERE BANANA ALLERGY NOTICE: An attendee has a severe and airborne allergy to bananas. The presence of bananas or any banana-containing products in the classroom poses a significant health risk to them. Please note:

    • Do not bring any bananas or any banana-containing products (such as banana bread, smoothies, etc.) to the symposium.
    • Read Labels: When bringing snacks or food items to the symposium, take a moment to check the ingredient list for any banana derivatives.
    • Be Mindful of Cross-Contamination: If you have consumed bananas before entering the symposium, ensure that your hands are thoroughly washed to prevent inadvertent cross-contamination.

    While the attendee will also take additional precautions to manage their allergy, we appreciate your help in minimizing risks and providing a safer space for all attendees.

    For other accommodation needs, please email us at crs@law.ucla.edu.


     

    Recording of the Symposium
    The symposium will not be livestreamed, but a recording of all panels will be posted online afterwards.


     

    Parking at UCLA
    There are several bike parking stations near the law school where you can park your bike/scooter.

    There is disabled person parking and limited hourly parking surrounding the law school.

    Lots 2 and 3 are the closest lots to the law school, and a map is attached showing their location.
    Map of the Campus with Labels for the Law School, Lot 2 and Lot 3

    It is a 10-15 minute walk from the parking lots to the law school.

    Parking costs range from $4 per hour to $27 for an all-day pass. Average day pass is $15. More information here.

    How to Pay for Parking
    UCLA parking payment machinePlease enter a Pay-by-Plate area (visitor parking) and park in any unreserved parking stall.

    Go to the nearest parking pay station machine (pictured at left) to purchase parking.

    When prompted, enter your license plate number into the pay station machine by using the number pad.

    Please retain the permit as a receipt for parking.

    Unless your vehicle does not have visible license plates, it is not necessary to display the permit. If your vehicle does not have a license plate, please enter the last six digits of the VIN and display the permit on the driver’s side dash. 


     

    Transportation to UCLA
    There are several public transportation options available to get to UCLA, read more here.

    Note: Bus lines that travel to UCLA on Hilgard from Sunset Blvd all have stops that are a short walk to the law school, which is at the corner of Hilgard and Wyton Avenue in Westwood. Because these buses travel on the same streets that will affect car traffic, we also advise you to allocate extra time for your trip to UCLA and to consult any ride-planning tools provided by the bus service you will be using to get to UCLA. The most convenient bus stop for UCLA would be the intersection of Hilgard and Westholme Ave., which offers a brisk, 5-minute walk to the law school grounds.

    For rideshare, please enter this address: 385 Charles E. Young Dr. East, Los Angeles, CA 90095


     

    Local Accommodations and Lodging Options
    The below hotel offers special discounts for booking your stay with them for the Symposium, subject to room availability:

    Hotel Angeleno

    • Distance from UCLA School of Law: 3.1 miles
    • Phone Number: (310) 476-6411
    • 170 N. Church Lane, Los Angeles, CA 90049
    • Rate: $185.00 plus tax, per night, per room.
    • Discounted Parking: $20 per day
    • Email Russell Kato (rkato@hotelangeleno.com) to reserve your room.

    The following hotels are all located within 5 miles of the UCLA School of Law, and though they do not currently offer any special discounts for Symposium guests, they are recommended by our staff. Please find the general and contact information for these local lodging options below:

    UCLA Guest House (conveniently located across from the UCLA campus)

    • Distance from UCLA School of Law: 0.1 miles
    • Phone Number: (310) 825-2923
    • 330 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095

    UCLA Tiverton House (located across from the UCLA campus)

    • Distance from UCLA School of Law: 1 mile
    • Phone Number: (310) 794-0151
    • 900 Tiverton Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024

    The Luxe Hotel – Sunset (located across the street from the Hotel Angeleno)

    • Distance from UCLA School of Law: 3.1 miles
    • Phone Number: (310) 476-6571
    • Luxe Hotel – Sunset
    • 11461 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90049

     

    Other Questions/AssistanceIf you have other questions or require any accommodations at the symposium, please contact us at crs@law.ucla.edu.

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