Critical Race Studies Student Orgs / Journals

  • The Asian Pacific American Law Journal (APALJ) focuses exclusively on the legal, social, and political issues affecting Asian Pacific American communities. APALJ plays an important role by providing a forum for legal scholars, practitioners, and students to communicate about emerging concerns and by disseminating these writings to the general population. We work hard to reach out to the community and initiate discourse on APALJ issues. APALJ members are involved in the entire journal publication process including selection, substantive editing, and cite-checking of all articles and comments. In addition to publishing law journals, APALJ hosts symposiums and live-speaker series.

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  • APILSA serves as a valuable resource and a significant social support network for law students to succeed academically, socially, politically, and professionally.  APILSA coordinates numerous events and activities that educate and inform members about current Asian Pacific Islander issues, and prepares members to manage such issues in both academic and professional legal settings.  APILSA also provides a common forum for expressing members’ needs and concerns as Asian Pacific Islander law students.  APILSA strives to develop innovative programs that lend academic and peer support, and aspires to continue its long-standing success.

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  • The Black Law Students Association (BLSA) of the University of California, Los Angeles is a component of a nationally incorporated organization. The recruitment and admission of Blacks into the law school are two of the foremost concerns of BLSA. BLSA is interested in the admission of persons who demonstrate an active desire to contribute to the Black community.

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  • Over the last 30 years, the Chicanx-Latinx Law Review (CLLR) has provided an essential forum for the discussion of central issues affecting the Latino community that "mainstream" law journals continue to ignore. In publishing Volume One, the Review introduced to the nation the first legal journal that recognized how common law, statutes, legislative policy and politically popular propositions impact the Latino community. Since 1972, the Review has established a reputation for publishing strong scholarly work on affirmative action and education, Spanish and Mexican land grants, environmental justice, language rights and immigration reform. The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania, Nevada Supreme Court and New Jersey Superior Court have cited the Review as a persuasive authority.​

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  • We are the Indigenous Peoples’ Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance and we are here to serve as a law journal that publishes writings concerning Native Peoples’ cultures, traditions, and histories. We publish with the goal of bettering and advancing Native Nations and Indian People. Our Journal is here to actively resist against the insidious effects of colonialism, racism, and the subjugation of Native Peoples. We promote Native scholarship, both student and faculty, and support Native scholars and voices. We partner with Native communities to publish writings that will bring attention to their specific situations and legal battles.

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  • The UCLA Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs is an interdisciplinary publication promoting scholarship in international law and foreign relations. It publishes articles by leading scholars, practitioners, and other professionals from around the world as well as student comments. Some of JILFA's issues are topical, focusing on immigration or international gender and race discrimination, and others offer more variety, ranging from conflicting approaches to technological developments, to the international criminal court, to sovereign debt crises.

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  • The UCLA National Black Law Journal has been committed to scholarly discourse exploring the intersection of race and the law for 35 years. The NBLJ was started in 1970 by five African-American law students and two African-American law professors. The Journal was the first of its kind in the country. Because of the drop in African-American students at UCLA School of Law after the passage of Proposition 209, the Journal was sent to Columbia where publication could be continued. One of the Journal's founding editors noted that it was important that there be a forum for providing a theoretical framework for practical daily application of black legal ideas and concepts.

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  • The Native American Law Students Association is a national organization. The objectives of the Native American Law Students Association at UCLA are to provide a support network for Native American law students and to create a base from which work can be done for the advancement of Native peoples. In addition, the Association strives to foster better communication among Native American law students, the Native American community and the general public by providing a forum for the discussion of current Native American issues.

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  • UCLA SALSA is dedicated to providing a forum for South Asian law students to exchange thoughts and ideas, develop a community support and referral network, and address the needs of the larger South Asian community—particularly its most marginalized members.

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  • We are dedicated to creating a safe space and a community within the UCLA School of Law where the unique experiences, opinions, challenges and successes of womyn and womyn of color are shared, discussed and developed. We are a collective of individuals who identify as womyn, womyn of color or allies. We are open to all people ready to engage in an open and honest dialogue about race, gender and the law. Our mission is to promote the empowerment, inspiration, and personal and professional development of womyn and people of color in the legal field.​

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