Critical Race Studies Multimedia Archives

The Critical Race Studies program presents many events on the cutting edge of critical race theory in legal scholarship and related disciplines, and CRS is pleased to offer recordings of its past events and symposia.

To stay up to date with plans for future events and symposia, subscribe to the CRS mailing list.

Archived Events

Note: Video recordings are also available for all past CRS Annual Symposium events.

  • 2020 Events

    The Execution of Lezmond Mitchell: Disdain for Life and Sovereignty

    September 17, 2020

    Link to video

    On August 19, 2020, the federal government executed Lezmond Mitchell, the only American Indian under a federal death penalty sentence, over the objections of the Navajo Nation. This panel explored the legal issues surrounding this case, including tribal sovereignty, criminal jurisdiction, and the role of the death penalty within American Indian communities.

    Panelists:

    Moderated by: Professor Angela R. Riley
    Jennifer Denetdale
    , Professor of American Studies, University of New Mexico
    Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Professor of Law, Michigan State University College of Law
    Addie C. Rolnick, Professor of Law, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    Carl Slater, Navajo Nation Council Delegate

    Sponsored by Native Nations Law and Policy Center and Critical Race Studies at UCLA School of Law.


    CRS 2020-21 Book Series: Inventing Latinos: A New Story of American Racism by Laura E. Gómez, in conversation with Cheryl I. Harris

    September 16, 2020

    Link to video

    UCLA Law Professor and Critical Race Studies co-founder Cheryl I. Harris and author and Critical Race Studies Faculty Director Laura E. Gómez discussed Gómez’s recently released book, Inventing Latinos: A New Story of American Racism.

    “In this thoughtfully argued study . . . Gómez provides much-needed insight into the true complexity of Latinx identity while revealing the ways in which the dominant culture continues to mask the many racist currents within American society. An insightful and well-researched book.” — Kirkus Reviews

    “Written with exceptional clarity and drawing on deep research, Inventing Latinos presents not only a brilliant account of the changing position of Latinxs, but also a nuanced understanding of racism in the U.S. today.” — Howard Winant, co-author of Racial Formation in the United States


    McGirt v. Oklahoma: A Mvskoke Triumph

    September 9, 2020

    Link to video

    On July 9, 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 5-4 decision in McGirt v. Oklahoma, holding that the reservation boundaries of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, as articulated in its treaties with the United States, remain intact. While the decision was a simple application of the rule of law, it rocked a century of jurisdictional encroachment. This panel explored the decision and its legal reasoning, and importantly, what a post-McGirt future entails for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and all of Indian country.

    Sponsored by Native Nations Law and Policy Center and Critical Race Studies at UCLA School of Law.


    Dismantling Racism: Critical Race Studies in Action

    July 30, 2020

    Link to video

    This webinar featured CRS alumni discussing anti-racist lawyering and advocacy in the current moment.

    Moderator

    • Jasleen Kohli, Director, Critical Race Studies Program, UCLA School of Law

    Panelists

    • Kristen A. Johnson, Assistant Counsel, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc., CRS '13
    • Priscilla Ocen, Professor of Law, Loyola Law School, former CRS Law Teaching Fellow 2010-2012, CRS '07
    • Kelly Orians, Co-Executive Director, The First 72+, CRS '15
    • Jason Wu, Staff Attorney, The Legal Aid Society (New York); Trustee, Association of Legal Aid Attorneys-UAW 2325, CRS '10

    What Critical Race Studies Teaches Us About Racism, Resistance & Policing

    July 7, 2020

    Link to video

    Moderator

    Panelists


    On the Margins: Social Justice, COVID-19 & Vulnerable Communities

    April 15, 2020

    Link to video

    Moderators

    • Jasleen Kohli
    • Karin Wang

    Panelists

    • Sharon Dolovich
    • Karlyn Kurichety
    • Rachel Torres
    • Nisha Vyas

    Resources

  • 2019 Events

    Strategies to Ignite Change: A Conversation with Civil Rights Expert Barbara Arnwine and Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw

    Strategies to Ignite Change: A Conversation with Civil Rights Expert Barbara Arnwine and Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw

    March 13, 2019

    Link to video

    Our Spring 2019 Critical Race Studies Practitioner-in-Residence Barbara Arnwine is the President and Founder of Transformative Justice Coalition, internationally renowned for its contributions to civil rights, including the Civil Rights Act of 1991, the 2006 reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act, and close work with the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty (where Arnwine serves as Vice-chair).

    Law students often wish for more access and opportunities to network with practitioners doing impactful work on the ground. The CRS Practitioner-in-Residence program fosters student connections with attorneys in the field who are doing cutting-edge work within the CRS mission.

     

    Critical Perspectives on Race and Human Rights: Transnational Re-Imaginings

    Critical Perspectives on Race and Human Rights: Transnational Re-Imaginings

    March 8, 2019

    Videos:

     

    This conference is jointly convened by UCLA's Critical Race Studies Program, Promise Institute for Human Rights, International and Comparative Law Program and Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs, and aims to foster a transnational, interdisciplinary academic inquiry among human rights, TWAIL and CRT scholars on some of the most pressing issues of our time.

    Contemporary global and national political crises, many of which threaten the human rights of millions and even the international human rights system itself, bring into sharp relief enduring legacies of racial injustice and racial inequality all over the world. Yet substantive racial justice and equality seem marginal within contemporary global human rights legal scholarship, discourse, institutions, and even among the advocacy organizations that wield the greatest international influence on issues of human rights concern. Novel, radical ways of re-imagining the role of law and legal institutions in achieving racial justice and equality are urgent, and this conference will convene an interdisciplinary group of scholars to consider the place of human rights in this larger context. It will explore critical perspectives on race and human rights from the joint perspectives of Critical Race Theory (CRT) and Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL).

     

    Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color in The Current Climate

    Invisible No More

    March 4, 2019

    Co-hosted with the Williams Institute.

    Andrea Ritchie is a Black lesbian immigrant and police misconduct attorney and organizer who has engaged in extensive research, writing, and advocacy around criminalization of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people of color over the past two decades. She recently published Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color now available from Beacon Press.

     

     

     

     

     

    Fighting Criminal (In)Justice, Building a Social Movement: Celebrating the Re-entry Clinic’s First Decade

    Fighting Criminal Injustice

    February 6, 2019

    Link to video

    Co-sponsored by El Centro Legal and BLSA.

    Formerly incarcerated persons face a myriad of challenges when they return to their communities and roles as parents, partners, and workers. Over the course of the past 10 years, 400 UCLA law students have volunteered their Saturdays in Watts, conducting intake interviews and providing legal consultation to 2,800 individuals. Under the supervision of volunteer attorneys (initially) or attorneys for A New Way of Life (three of them former re-entry clinic student volunteers themselves), they have collectively filed 8,400 post-conviction relief petitions with an 85% success rate. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors recently recognized the program's impact.

     

    Panelists:

    Saúl Sarabia '96
    Chair, Los Angeles County Probation Reform Implementation Team
    Academic Coordinator, UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Education
    Critical Race Studies Program Director, 2005-11

    Priscilla Ocen '07
    Professor, Loyola Law School
    Vice-chair, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Civilian Oversight Commission
    CRS Teaching Fellow, 2010-12

    CT Turney-Lewis '13
    Supervising Staff Attorney, A New Way of Life Re-Entry Project

    Maryam Abidi '20
    Co-Chair, El Centro Legal/CRS Re-entry Legal Clinic

  • 2018 Events

    Emerging Veteran Legal Issues: At the Intersections and Margins of Justice

    Emerging Veteran Legal Issues: At the Intersections and Margins of Justice

    October 17, 2018

    Link to video

    Panelists included:
    Elizabeth Perez | Deputy Secretary of Minority Affairs California Department of Veterans Affairs
    Sgt. Tracey Cooper-Harris | Plaintiff, Cooper-Harris v. USA 
    Mia Yamamoto | Criminal Defense and Civil Rights Attorney (Vietnam-era Veteran)

    The panel explored the untold story of veterans, especially focusing on an intersectional analysis of issues faced by LGBTQ veterans, veterans of color, and homeless veterans.

     

     

     

    The Carceral State and the Regulation of Motherhood

    The Carceral State and the Regulation of Motherhood

    October 3, 2018

    Link to video

    Priscilla Ocen, Professor of Law at Loyola Law School and former Critical Race Studies Teaching Fellow, on The Carceral State and the Regulation of Motherhood.

    Across the country, incarcerated women are separated from their children and subject to pervasive forms of reproductive abuse. Often, the familial separation and reproductive abuse experienced by women prisoners is framed as a "collateral" or "unintended" consequence of women's imprisonment. Professor Ocen, however, contests this framing, arguing that the regulation of women's reproductive and familial autonomy is an essential function of women's prisons in the United States.

     

    Race, Law, and the Current Moment: A Critical Race Studies Perspective

    Race, Law, and the Current Moment: A Critical Race Studies Perspective

    September 5, 2018

    Link to video

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Trumping Our Rights: Re-Centering our Advocacy in the Age of 45

    Trumping Our Rights: Re-Centering our Advocacy in the Age of 45

    March 16, 2018

    On Friday, March 16, 2018, the National Black Law Journal hosted a symposium in collaboration with the Critical Race Studies program titled "Trumping Our Rights: Re-Centering our Advocacy in the Age of 45." This symposium focused on the effects that the current President's policies and judicial appointees have had and will have on the Black community, as well as how we can overcome these challenges as lawyers and activists to continue fighting for the liberation of our people.

    LINK TO VIDEO OF MORNING SESSIONS

    Immigration and International Rights Panel
    The Immigration and International Rights panel will discuss how the current administration's policies have affected Black immigrants and the African diaspora from as near as Haiti and as far as Chad. Panelists will discuss topics including, but not limited to, the travel bans, the end of temporary protected status for Haitian immigrants, and DACA. Our panelists are:

    Tendayi Achiume
    Assistant Professor of Law at UCLA Law

    Khaled Beydoun
    Associate Professor of Law at University of Detroit Mercy Law

    Jennifer Chacón
    Chancellor's Professor of Law at UC Irvine Law

    Moderator: Letlhogonolo Mokgoroane
    UCLA School of Law, LLM Student '18

    Criminal Justice and Policing Panel
    The Criminal Justice and Policing panel will examine aspects of the criminal justice system both pre and post the Donald Trump White House. The discussion will include an examination of how the current U.S. Attorney General's policies target Black people and communities. Topics will range from predatory policing and Fourth Amendment law to the privatization of federal prisons, the relaunch of the War on Drugs, and the departure from investigations of police departments accused of various forms of state violence. Our panelists are:

    Devon Carbado
    The Honorable Harry Pregerson Professor of Law at UCLA Law

    Lisa Holder
    Lecturer in Law at UCLA Law

    Sunita Patel
    Assistant Professor of Law, Faculty Director, UCLA Veterans Legal Clinic

    Moderator: Priscilla Ocen
    Professor of Law, Loyola Law School

    LINK TO VIDEO OF AFTERNOON SESSIONS

    Education Panel
    The Education panel will explore the ways in which this administration's policies negatively impact Black students. Panelists will discuss topics including, but not limited to, the school-to-prison pipeline, increased funding for charter schools in conjunction with decreased funding for traditional public schools, access to higher education, and changes to financial aid. Our panelists are:

    Cheryl Harris 
    Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties at UCLA Law

    Jonathan Glater
    Professor of Law at UC Irvine Law

    Steven Nelson
    Assistant Professor of Leadership & Policy Studies at University of Memphis

    Kimberly West-Faulcon
    James P. Bradley Chair in Constitutional Law at Loyola Law School

    Moderator: Caleb Jackson
    UCLA School of Law, J.D. '18

    Gender & Sexuality Panel
    The Gender and Sexuality panel will interrogate the threat that this administration poses to Black women and the LGBTQ community, as well as the tools of advocacy we should employ as lawyers and activists to combat these threats. Panelists will discuss topics including, but not limited to, the administration's attack on women's reproductive rights, LGBTQ rights, and protections against sexual assault through an intersectional lens. Our panelists are:

    Michele Goodwin
    Chancellor's Professor of Law at UC Irvine Law

    Russell Robinson
    Distinguished HAAS Chair in LGBT Equity Professor of Law at UC Berkeley Law

    Moderator: Akiesha Anderson
    Daniel H. Renberg Law Fellow 

     

    Celebrating the Second Edition of Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican American Race

    Celebrating the Second Edition of Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican American Race

    March 6, 2018

    Link to video

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Re-Centering the Conversation to the Margins: Race, Gender, and Low Wage Workers

    Re-Centering the Conversation to the Margins: Race, Gender, and Low Wage Workers

    February 26, 2018

    Link to video

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Becoming Ms. Burton: From Prison to Recovery to Leading the Fight for Incarcerated Women

    Becoming Ms. Burton: From Prison to Recovery to Leading the Fight for Incarcerated Women

    February 21, 2018

    Link to video

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    From the NFL to the Crenshaw Line: Black Workers Matter

    From the NFL to the Crenshaw Line: Black Workers Matter

    February 14, 2018

    Link to video

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • 2017 Events

    Anti-Racist Lawyering and Activism: The View from Los Angeles

    Anti-Racist Lawyering and Activism: The View from Los Angeles

    October 24, 2017

    Link to video

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Charlottesville and Beyond: Unpacking White Supremacy

    Charlottesville and Beyond: Unpacking White Supremacy

    September 19, 2017

    Link to video

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America - A Book Talk with James Forman Jr.

    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America - A Book Talk with James Forman Jr.

    September 26, 2017

    Link to video

    ​James Forman Jr., Professor of Law at Yale Law School, spoke about his new book Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America.

    A former D.C. public defender, Forman tells riveting stories of politicians, community activists, police officers, defendants, and crime victims. He writes with compassion about individuals trapped in terrible dilemmas—from the men and women he represented in court to officials struggling to respond to a public safety emergency. Locking Up Our Own enriches our understanding of why our society became so punitive and offers important lessons to anyone concerned about the future of race and the criminal justice system in this country.

  • 2016 Events

    Frontlines: Policing at the Nexus of Race and Mental Health

    Frontlines: Policing at the Nexus of Race and Mental Health

    February 2, 2016

    Link to video

    Introduction: Jyoti Nanda (Lecturer in Law)

    Speaker: Camille Nelson, Professor of Law and former Dean at Suffolk University Law School

    A widely published scholar and sought-after speaker, Camille Nelson is an expert on the intersection of critical race theory and cultural studies with particular emphasis on criminal law and procedure, health law, and comparative law. Nelson recently served a 5-year term (2010–2015) as dean of Suffolk University Law School in Boston, where she is currently a professor of law. During her tenure as dean at Suffolk, she led the creation of the school’s first strategic plan and achieved considerable successes in fundraising, grant writing, and program and partnership development.

    This event was co-sponsored by Repair

     

    Security, Theology, Surveillance and the Politics of Fear

    Security, Theology, Surveillance and the Politics of Fear

    February 3, 2016

    Link to video

    Speaker: Nadera Shalhoub Kevorkian, Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law and the School of Social Work and Social Welfare, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian is a longtime anti-violence, Palestinian feminist activist and scholar. She is the Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law at the Faculty of Law-Institute of Criminology and the School of Social Work and Public Welfare at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Shalhoub-Kevorkian is also the director of the Gender Studies Program at Mada al-Carmel, the Arab Center for Applied Social Research in Haifa. Her research focuses on femicide and other forms of gendered violence, crimes of abuse of power in settler colonial contexts, surveillance, securitization, and trauma in militarized and colonized zones. Her most recent book, Security Theology, Surveillance and the Politics of Fear was published by Cambridge University Press in 2015. As a resident of the old city of Jerusalem, Shalhoub-Kevorkian engages in direct actions and critical dialogue to end the inscription of power over Palestinian children’s lives, spaces of death, and women’s birthing bodies and lives.

    This event was co-sponsored by UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies

     

    Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution: Screening and Discussion

    Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution: Screening and Discussion

    February 18, 2016

    Link to video

    The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution is the first feature-length documentary to explore the Black Panther Party, its significance to the broader American culture, its cultural and political awakening for black people, and the painful lessons wrought when a movement derails. After a screening of the film, the Critical Race Studies Program hosted a discussion featuring:

    Kimberlé W. Crenshaw, Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

    Cheryl Harris, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, UCLA School of Law Interim Chair, UCLA Department of African American Studies

    Ericka Huggins, Human rights activist, poet, educator, Black Panther leader and former political prisoner

    Robin D.G. Kelley, Gary B. Nash Professor of American History, UCLA

    Uri McMillan, Associate Professor of English and African American Studies, UCLA

    This event was co-sponsored by African American Policy Forum and UCLA African American Studies Center

     

    Is Separation the Solution?

    May 6, 2016

    Link to video

    May 7, 2016

    Link to video

    In recent years, single-sex education has been promoted as a critical intervention to target achievement disparities and related challenges facing boys of color. While the prevalence of single-sex education has steadily declined throughout the nation as a whole, single-sex classrooms have reemerged as an attractive option within initiatives such as My Brothers Keeper and other male empowerment programs. Gender-separated interventions have been premised on the assumption that boys and girls of color face distinct disparities, and that these unique challenges are best approached by distinctly gendered approaches to education.
    This convening brought together researchers, practitioners, advocates and philanthropic partners to explore the rise of gender-separate approaches to public education reform. Among the central questions to considered were: What conceptions of racial justice and gender difference underwrite the move to gender separate solutions to low achievement? Are there gender disparities in private and public resources being made available to address the needs of boys of color and girls of color? If so, how can this problem be addressed? What legal issues are raised by the proliferation of single-sex classes and schools, and how can we ensure that Title IX and constitutional protections are enforced? What role should philanthropy and community engagement play in elevating the values of race and gender equity in contemporary school reform?

    Speaker: Kimberlé W. Crenshaw, Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

    This event was co-sponsored by UCLA Gender Working Group, UCLA Center for American Politics and Public Policy (CAPPP), UCLA Department of Gender Studies, UCLA Race and Ethnicity Working Group, UCLA Department of African American Studies, California NOW Chapter of Greater Los Angeles, African American Policy Forum, Columbia Law Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies

     

    Race and Supreme Court

    Race and Supreme Court

    September 15, 2016

    Link to video

    Critical Race scholars engaged in a discussion of the 2015-16 Supreme Court term and the ramifications of its decisions.

    Moderator: Jasleen Kohli, Director, Critical Race Studies Program, UCLA School of Law

    Panelists:

    Beth Colgan, Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

    Michele Bratcher Goodwin, Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Director, Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy, University of California, Irvine School of Law

    Cheryl Harris, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, UCLA School of Law Interim Chair, UCLA Department of African American Studies

    Hiroshi Motomura, Susan Westerberg Prager Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

    Angela R. Riley, Professor of law and Director, MA/JD Joint Degree Program in Law and American Indian Studies Director, Native Nations Law and Policy Center, UCLA School of Law

    This event was co-sponsored by David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy, Asian/Pacific Islander Law Students Association, Black Law Students Association, La Raza Law Students Association, Muslim Law Students Association, Native American Law Students Association, South Asian Law Students Association, Womyn of Color Collective

     

    Fifteen Years on: "Divided We Fall" and the Politics of Race and Religion after 9/11

    Fifteen Years on: "Divided We Fall" and the Politics of Race and Religion after 9/11

    September 19, 2016

    Link to video

    When a turbaned Sikh man is brutally murdered in the aftermath of September 11, 2001, a college student journeys across America to discover who counts as "one of us" in a world divided into "us" and "them." Armed with only a camera, Valarie Kaur encounters hundreds of stories never before told - stories of fear and unspeakable loss, but also of resilience and hope - until she finally finds the heart of America, halfway around the world, in the words of a widow. Weaving expert analysis into a personal journey and cross-country road trip, the film confronts the forces dividing a nation. Professor Asli Bali led a discussion after a screening of the film.

    Speaker: Asli Ü. Bâli, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Near Eastern Studies

    This event was co-sponsored by UCLA Office of Student Affairs

     

    Race, Racism and American Law, Re-visioning for the 21st Century

    Race, Racism and American Law, Re-visioning for the 21st Century

    September 22, 2016

    Link to video

    Derrick Bell’s seminal textbook, Race, Racism and American Law, first issued in 1972, was a groundbreaking intervention that challenged the dominant view of legal pedagogy as a race-neutral process and product. Unlike other casebooks that adopted "perspectivelessness" as the mark of objectivity. Bell pursued a complex, more accurate vision, rooted in history and inspired by a black radical tradition. Its impact was throughout the legal academy and resonates still.

    The co-authors of the seventh edition, Professor Cheryl I. Harris and Justin Hansford, led a panel discussion on the significance and legacy of Bell’s text, and were joined by experts in the field of race, racism and American Law who are part of the project of re-visioning the text for the 21st Century.

    Speakers:

    Cheryl Harris, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, UCLA School of Law Interim Chair, UCLA Department of African American Studies

    Justin Hansford, Associate Professor, St. Louis University School of Law

    This event was co-sponsored by UCLA Institute of American Cultures, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation, UCLA Asian American Studies Center, Office of the Special Assistant for Diversity St. Louis University, St. Louis University School of Law

  • 2015 Events

    Post-9/11 Racialization of Middle Eastern and South Asian Communities

    April 1, 2015

    LINK TO VIDEO

    Moderator:

    Maytha Alhassen, Provost Ph.D. Fellow in American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California

    Speakers:

    Sohail Daulatzai, Associate Professor, Film and Media Studies and African American Studies, School of Humanities, University of California at Irvine

    John Tehranian, Irwin R. Buchalter Professor of Law, Southwestern Law School

    This event is co-sponsored by:

    Asian Pacific Islander Law Students Association, Black Law Students Association, La Raza, Muslim Law Studies Association, Native American Law Students Association, and South Asian Law Students Association

    Dorothy Roberts: Fatal Invention-The New Biopolitics of Race

    February 19, 2015

    LINK TO VIDEO

    Description: “We are witnessing the emergence of a new biopolitics in the United States that relies on re-inventing race in biological terms using cutting-edge genomic sequence and biotechnologies. Some scientists are defining race as a biological category written in our genes, while the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries convert the new racial science into race-based products, such as race-specific medicines and ancestry tests that incorporate false assumptions of racial difference at the genetic level. The genetic understanding of race calls for technological responses to racial disparities while masking the continuing impact of racism in a supposedly post-racial society. Instead, I call for affirming our common humanity by working to end social inequalities supported by the political system of race.”

    Introduction by: Jyoti Nanda (Lecturer in Law)

    Presentation by: Dorothy Roberts (George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology and the Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights, University of Pennsylvania Law School)

     

    Pigford v. Glickman: Addressing USDA Racial Discrimination with One of the Largest Civil Rights Settlements in History

    January 28, 2015

    Video unavailable

    In Pigford v. Glickman, African-American farmers claimed the USDA had systematically discriminated against them on the basis of race, wrongfully denying them of farm loans and assistance. A successful case relating to discrimination against Native American farmers also followed. Although the Pigford case was settled, many farmers were unable to file claims before the deadline and numerous lawsuits were filed. Over a decade later in 2010, Congress approved $1.25 billion to pay claims and other expenses as part of the settlement of Pigford II.

    Please join us for an insightful presentation with Mr. Anurag Varma and Prof. Angela P. Harris as they discuss the history, significance, and impact of the Pigford case.

    Speakers:

    Anurag Varma, partner at Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, has served as class counsel on behalf of the Native American and African-American farmers against the USDA.

    Angela P. Harris, Professor of Law at UC Davis School of Law, writes widely in the field of critical legal theory and applies her insights tot he fields of environmental and food justice.

    This event is co-sponsored by:

    The Resnick Program for Food law and Policy, Food Law Society, Black Law Student Association, and the Native American Law Students Association

     

  • 2014 Events

    Bringing the War on Terror Home: Islamophobia and the Erosion of Civil Liberties Post-9/11
    October 23, 2014
    LINK TO VIDEO

    The domestic front of the “war on terror” has produced a sprawling counterterrorism system of policing and surveillance in the United States that stretches from NSA wiretapping to the surveillance of mosques to ballooning no-fly lists to the construction of new modes of preventive detention. These developments have also been accompanied by a sharp increase in private activities targeting affected communities with hate crimes and harassment. These developments constrain the civil liberties of Muslim-Americans, treated as objects of suspicion by neighbors and colleagues while being overtly targeted by the myriad “counterradicalization” programs adopted by police departments across the country. But the climate of fear and suspicion also extends to those who report on or criticize “war on terror” policies at home and abroad, with an unprecedented degree of pressure on journalists, investigative reporters and even academics who expose government policies to public scrutiny or critique U.S. foreign policy or American allies in the never-ending war on terror. This panel features Arun Kundnani, author of the recent book Muslims Are Coming!, which chronicles and offers a comprehensive critique of counterradicalization strategies. Mr. Kundnani is joined by Ahilan Arulanantham, who has litigated some of the most significant cases challenging government surveillance practices in Southern California, and by Yaman Salahi, who has been working to shed light on public and private efforts to restrict academic freedom.

    From Gaza to Ferguson
    September 18, 2014
    LINK TO VIDEO

    From the Washington Postto Ebony Magazine to the streets of Ferguson and beyond, connections between events in Ferguson and Gaza have captured the popular imagination. This panel examines and explores the relationship between race, the rise of militarized policing, and the response to dissent in the United States and consider its implications in a global context.

    Moderated by CRS Professor Aslı Bâli. Panelists include CRS Professor Cheryl I. Harris, Professor Robin D.G. Kelley, Professor Donna Murch, Professor Sherene Seikaly, and Hedy Epstein.

    For further reading:

    Ian Haney Lopez on his new book, Dog Whistle Politics: How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism and Wrecked the Middle Class

    March 3, 2014
    Link to video

    The Color of Criminal Suspicion: Racial Profiling, Surveillance, and the Policing of Our Communities
    February 20, 2014
    Link to Video

    Examining the NYPD’s Stop and Frisk program, the recent Floyd, et. al. v. City of New York, et al. decision, the NYPD’s counterterrorism surveillance program, and the LAPD’s SARS program.

    Panelists:

    Devon Carbado, UCLA School of Law

    Amna Akbar, Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

    Hamid Khan, Stop LAPD Spying Coalition

    Moderator:

    Khaled Beydoun, UCLA School of Law

    Introduction:

    Asli U. Bali, UCLA School of Law

    From Ground Zero: UCLA Law Students on the Past, Present, and Future of Affirmative Action
    February 19, 2014
    Link to Video

    While debates over affirmative action often view students of color only as data points, in fact students, particularly UCLA Law students of color, have played a pivotal role in shaping the public discourse and the legal doctrine. This panel features UCLA alumnae of color who wrote an amicus brief, were interveners, and were witnesses in Grutter v Bollinger, the Michigan affirmative action case decided by the Supreme Court in 2003. Looking to the future, the panel also includes alumnae of color who are working on current legislation and other initiatives to reverse the damaging effects of Proposition 209 on higher education.

    Panelists:

    Erika Dowdell ’05, Deputy Public Defender, County of Los Angeles

    Anthony Solana, Jr. ’04, President and Chairperson, For People of Color, Inc.

    Erika K. Wilson ’03, Assistant Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law

    Moderator:

    Cheryl I. Harris, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, UCLA School of Law

     

  • 2013 Events

    Race Undercover: Unpacking the Trayvon Martin Tragedy
    October 2, 2013
    Link to video

    The acquittal of George Zimmerman for the murder of Trayvon Martin unleashed a debate about self-defense, guns, and, most importantly, the role of race in the events surrounding Trayvon’s death as well as the courtroom. This panel proposes to unpack this debate and expose the assumptions surrounding the colorblind framing that largely drove the discussion. Questions to be considered include: Was the verdict a foregone conclusion? How did stand your ground law play a role in the case? What is the significance of the case and the verdict in the broader context of societal violence and use of force by private and public actors?

    Panelists:

    Sherod Thaxton, Assistant Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

    Robin D.G. Kelley, Gary B. Nash Professor of American History, UCLA Law

    Peter Bibring, Adjunct Faculty, UCLA School of Law; Senior Staff Attorney, ACLU of Southern California

    Addie C. Rolnick, Associate Professor of Law, University of Nevada Las Vegas

    Moderator:

    Kimberlé Crenshaw, Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

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